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March 29, 2012

Sweet Home Manitoba

This isn't my usual decorating/re purpose post. Rather it is a salute to a place that doesn't care much about decorating or style or the latest and greatest trends. (No offence).

It has something better than that. It has a sense of home that isn't created by design. It's created by people and love and family and a unified spirit.


My husband and I went back to his home town this week of Elkhorn, Manitoba (that's the province North of North Dakota for American readers) for his grandfather's funeral.


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Notice the slogan? Friendly Manitoba? It's well suited.

This is the province where people always wave when they pass you on the road. Because if they don't know you, they probably know your dad.

Elkhorn is the proud home of Sheldon Kennedy,
and the Manitoba Auto Museum.

(Some of the funniest small-town stories I've ever heard come from here - that's a whole other blog!)



Although I had no Internet or cell phone reception I managed to survive! 



Probably because I had no Internet service or cell phone reception, I had the opportunity to really experience a home sweet nest!

For those of you from small prairie towns or farming communities you probably know what I'm talking about.


Elkhorn has a population of aprox. 500 people. And pretty much everyone knows everyone. Have you ever seen that movie Sweet Home Alabama? Well it's pretty much the same flavor!
Homes in Elkhorn aren't created by the newest trends in lighting. There is no Benjamin Moore and certainly no Annie Sloan stockist.

But there are the best cooks, the handiest men, the friendliest neighbors and the best sense of community that I have ever known. There was an unlimited supply of meals, deserts, phone calls, caring and sense of family.

My husband was blessed to grow up there. And I am honored to have them accept me as part of the community when we visit.


Our weekend was made so much easier by caring neighbors and friends, close family and of course fantastic cooking.

I hate to admit it, but here in the lower mainland of BC,  we don't know most of our neighbors and I doubt if anyone would eat food brought over by a stranger. It's sad, and my husband and I were both over due for a reminder of what home really means. Even though it was a quick trip and a sad occasion brought us all together, it was nice. It was so nice.

So, if you are from such a small town - don't take it for granted. And if you don't live there anymore - don't forget to go visit once in awhile.

Just like Dorothy said...there's no place like home.



12 comments:

  1. What a great post! Love the sentiment and the reminder of what really matters. ~ Maureen

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  2. Hi, Elisa!
    I am sorry to hear about your husband's grandfather. But I am glad you had a warm welcome in his old town.
    We need to catch up!
    Send me an email when we have more time.
    Take care,

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  3. I agree. Small towns are the best. I grew up in small-town Ontario and I love returning there as often as I can. Even my children, who are growing up in a much larger town, recognize the simplicity of life in a smaller town - "Nana knows EVERYONE here, right?"

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  4. Small towns are the best!

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  5. It always amazed me living in the lower mainland and I would meet someone and get to know them. Our conversation would turn to the neighborhood they lived in and some of them had lived beside the same person for 10 years and they did not know their name or where they worked or anything.

    The lower mainland to me was very impersonal and everyone was in a hurry all the time and felt their time was more important than mine. Growing up in a small town shapes you into the person that you are and has lasting effects. Like stopping to help someone that is stuck in the snow, change a tire - you name it. I am proud to be from a small town but still enjoy the many pleasures a city can offer.

    I still hold the door open for people and expect a thanks or thank you but am not surprised anymore when there is no response.

    I miss the days of the door always being open to visitors, coffee pot was always on and it was nothing to set an extra plate for dinner.

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  6. Wow, sounds like a wonderful place! Thank you for sharing! :-)

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